Oxford King James Bible or Canbridge King James Bible?

For hundreds of years, there have been basically two main printers of the King James Bible in England – the Oxford Press and the Cambridge Press.
There are only three differences between the Oxford King James Bible and the Cambridge King James Bible. For those who believe as I do in the preservation of an inerrant, perfect Word of God, the differences are worth noting.

Which one is the Inspired, Preserved Word of God?

Interestingly, there is only a one word difference in each of the three verses, and all in the Old Testament. Even more interesting is the fact that there is actually only one letter difference in each of the words.

Note: The Oxford King James Bible has been used more widely in America than the Cambridge. This is especially noteworthy in light of the Wednesday Night Bible Study, “God’s Word for a New Nation,” which you can listen to on the Recorded Messages / Wednesday Night Bible Studies page.

Below are the three verses that differ so you can compare them.

Oxford:  Jeremiah 34:16  But ye turned and polluted my name, and caused every man his servant, and every man his handmaid, whom he had set at liberty at their pleasure, to return, and brought them into subjection, to be unto you for servants and for handmaids.

Cambridge:  Jeremiah 34:16  But ye turned and polluted my name, and caused every man his servant, and every man his handmaid, whom ye had set at liberty at their pleasure, to return, and brought them into subjection, to be unto you for servants and for handmaids.

In the phrase, “every man his servant, and every man his handmaid, whom he had set at liberty…,” the people doing the setting at liberty are those referred to as “his”. Therefore, though God is chastising a group of people, He is holding each individual responsible, hence the use of the singular word “his servant,” and “his handmaid, as opposed to “their servant” and “their handmaid.” Thus, the Oxford text is correct in using the word “he” instead of “ye”!

Oxford: 2 Chronicles 33:19  His prayer also, and how God was entreated of him, and all his sins, and his trespass, and the places wherein he built high places, and set up groves and graven images, before he was humbled: behold, they are written among the sayings of the seers.

Cambridge: 2 Chronicles 33:19  His prayer also, and how God was entreated of him, and all his sin, and his trespass, and the places wherein he built high places, and set up groves and graven images, before he was humbled: behold, they are written among the sayings of the seers.

The word “all” infers more than one; therefore the Oxford text is correct: “all his sins”. Mannaseh had committed a grievous trespass against the Lord, and in the process, committed many sins; but he got right with the Lord His God and God forgave him. This corresponds to the principle in 1 John 1:9 where the Bible says that if we confess our sins, He [God] is faithful and just to forgive us our sins and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness. If we confess even one known sin (or more if the need is there) God is faithful and just to forgive that sin and to cleanse us from all other things in our life that are not right.

Oxford: Nahum 3:16  Thou hast multiplied thy merchants above the stars of heaven: the cankerworm spoileth, and fleeth away.

Cambridge: Nahum 3:16  Thou hast multiplied thy merchants above the stars of heaven: the cankerworm spoileth, and flieth away.

Worms don’t fly, they flee. Fleeing is confirmed in the very next verse, where, referring to grasshoppers, the Bible says they flee away; so fleeing is the activity described.

Nahum 3:17  “Thy crowned are as the locusts, and thy captains as the great grasshoppers, which camp in the hedges in the cold day, but when the sun ariseth they flee away, and their place is not known where they are.”

So, again, the Oxford text, the one God gave to America, is correct!!!

Score: Oxford – 3; Cambridge – 0

http://www.35thavenuebaptist.org/oxford-kjb-or-cambridge-kjb.html

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